Issues Research & Analysis
More background information and historic documents on this topic may be available in the 'Essential Resources' section of this website, or in a previous edition of CMR E-Notes, archived here.
October 13, 2015

CMR Analyzes USMC Women in Combat Research Data: Part II

After four years of comprehensive Marine Corps research, results clearly show that the case for women in direct ground combat still has not been made.  In fact, tests have produced highly credible, reality-based, empirical data that discredits theories about gender equality in the combat arms.

This is the unmistakable message conveyed in a significant memorandum signed by Brig. Gen. George W. Smith, Jr., Director of the Marine Corps Force Innovation Office at Quantico, VA, which the Center for Military Readiness has analyzed here:

Interim CMR Special Report – Part II, Section A

U.S. Marine Corps Research Finding: Where Is the Case for Co-Ed Ground Combat?

General Smith’s 14-page August 18, 2015, memorandum to the Commandant of the Marine Corps, released with 19 additional pages, included . . . Read More

From: Tags
September 23, 2015

The following op-ed by CMR President Elaine Donnelly was published in the Washington Times Commentary section under the title Marines Lives Matter (Sept. 15, 2015)

Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has announced his intent to disregard the best professional advice of the Marine Corps.  Not on a minor issue, like buying helicopters.  This is about “gender diversity” mandates that could cost lives in land combat missions involving national security. 

In 2012, the Marines initiated scientific research on the physical and operational consequences of assigning women to combat arms units such as infantry, armor, artillery, and Special Operations Forces.  At the point of the bayonet, these units attack the enemy with deliberate offensive action.

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August 18, 2015

The U.S. Army has announced that for the first time ever, two female officers are about to graduate from the exceptionally tough, three-phase Ranger Course.  The Center for Military Readiness (CMR) congratulates the still-unnamed U.S. Military Academy graduates for persevering and earning their colleagues’ respect. 

There is reason for caution, however, before drawing the conclusion that women in the military should be considered interchangeable with men in combat arms units such as the infantry, armor, cannon field artillery, and Special Operations Forces

CMR takes issue with Obama Defense Department leaders and “politicians in uniform.”  These include Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jon Greenert – who, according to an AP report, [i] wants to gender-integrate Navy SEAL teams ˗˗ Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, who overruled surface Navy concerns about enormous costs for restructuring small ships for gender-integration, and just-retired Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno. . . . Read More

June 22, 2015

The Pentagon Makes Sexual Orientation a Special Class

In the classic TV series “M*A*S*H*,” Corp. Maxwell Klinger, played by Jamie Farr, dressed in women’s clothes in hopes that he might be sent home from the Korean War.  Decades later, Pentagon officials have embraced policies that might encourage real-life “Corp. Klingers” to cross-dress in order to qualify for “sexual orientation” diversity promotions. 

This is not an outlandish scenario, given what Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter said during the 4th Annual LGBT Equality Day celebration at the Pentagon on June 9.   The event celebrated lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgenders in the military  . . .  Read More

June 9, 2015
While some American military leaders are preparing to order women into combat arms units such as the infantry by January 2016, the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD) are moving in the opposite direction.  The Israeli and British decisions to keep certain land combat units all-male reflect extensive field tests and U.S. Marine Corps research confirming major differences in the physical capabilities of military women and men in the combat arms. . . . Read More